Archive for the islam Category

Israel and the United Nations

Posted in islam with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on April 22, 2012 by britishloyalist

Advertisements

Islam’s war on freedom

Posted in British Government, immigrants, islam, islam UK with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 22, 2012 by britishloyalist

Islamic teacher-under-fire-for-calling-on-welsh-muslims-to-support-fight-for-sharia-law-abroad

Posted in islam, islam UK, Wales with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 22, 2012 by britishloyalist

An Islamic teacher whose group was at the centre of an anti-terror raid on a Cardiff community hall has come under fire for calling on Welsh muslims to “physically” support the fight for sharia law abroad.

Abu Hajar, of Grangetown, Cardiff, is one of the leaders of the Islamic group Supporters of Tawheed, which on its website says its core belief is the “domination of the world by Islam”.

The group – which according to its website also rejects democracy and freedom, describing them as “false deities” – hit the headlines in January when one man arrested during a raid on a meeting in the city’s Canton Community Hall told an officer “I will chop your head off” before shouting “I’m going to shoot you with a machine gun”. Mohammed Abdin, 21, was subsequently jailed for eight months for the threats.

It is understood the raids were prompted by members of the Muslim community, who feared the meeting was providing a place for radical Islamists to network.

Mr Hajar has previously said the group is simply interested in spreading the message of Islam and does not preach violence or extremism.

In a video posted last month on YouTube called “Support the Muslims of Syria”, Mr Hajar said muslims should: snub western help abroad; demand an “Islamic solution” to problems in the Middle East; and impose sharia law there.

Protests in Syria
An Islamic teacher whose group was at the centre of an anti-terror raid on a Cardiff community hall has come under fire for calling on Welsh muslims to “physically” support the fight for sharia law abroad.

Abu Hajar, of Grangetown, Cardiff, is one of the leaders of the Islamic group Supporters of Tawheed, which on its website says its core belief is the “domination of the world by Islam”.

The group – which according to its website also rejects democracy and freedom, describing them as “false deities” – hit the headlines in January when one man arrested during a raid on a meeting in the city’s Canton Community Hall told an officer “I will chop your head off” before shouting “I’m going to shoot you with a machine gun”. Mohammed Abdin, 21, was subsequently jailed for eight months for the threats.

It is understood the raids were prompted by members of the Muslim community, who feared the meeting was providing a place for radical Islamists to network.

Mr Hajar has previously said the group is simply interested in spreading the message of Islam and does not preach violence or extremism.

In a video posted last month on YouTube called “Support the Muslims of Syria”, Mr Hajar said muslims should: snub western help abroad; demand an “Islamic solution” to problems in the Middle East; and impose sharia law there.

In the 14-minute video he addresses the people of Syria, saying: “Our money is with you and, if need be and if we are able to, our muslims will come and respond to your call physically as well.

“So we call upon the muslims to be steadfast in this struggle, to call for sharia, to call for an Islamic solution…to continue rising up against [these] regimes, whether that be in Tunisia, in Syria, in Egypt, even in Saudi Arabia, even in Yemen.

“The muslims in Jordan need to rise up and we the muslims will respond to your call.”

And he hit out at Western involvement in the region, adding: “We are not here to call upon freedom, to call for democracy, to call for human rights. Remember these words are very establishments, these are the very causes of the oppression that has taken place in these muslim lands.”

The UN estimates about 9,000 people have died in Syria since protests against President Bashar Assad began in March 2011, prompting a brutal Government crackdown.

And on Friday Syrian troops shelled a rebel-held area of Homs and sent reinforcements to border areas as the opposition called for fresh protests after the United Nations accused President Assad of failing to honour a peace plan which went into effect a week ago.

The video is posted with the text: “For far too long the Ummah [the global community of Arab nations] has been in crisis, facing oppression, injustice and betrayal by our leaders but we need to ask ourselfs what will it take for us to act? how many Muslims need to be killed before we realise our responsibilities?”

And adds: “We will all be held accountable about what we did to help our brothers and sisters all over the world who? are undergoing distress at the hands of the kufaar [nonbelievers].”

Monmouth MP David Davies said fundamentalism was “unacceptable in our community”.

He said: “They [fundamentalists] have a rather warped interpretation of the Koran that seems to have taken hold of a worrying number of people across the world who follow Islam.

“That particular interpretation is incompatible with the principles of equality for men and women and democracy we take for granted.

“For some people a literal interpretation of the Koran is that all laws are handed down by God and that man does not have the right to change and alter laws.

“That is incompatible with a democracy.”

He said Britain was “more enlightened” and we should not apologise “for our own culture”.

The MP claimed our culture was often wrongly put on an equal footing with those holding fundamentalist values. “Our values are better than other peoples,” he said.

“We believe in equal rights for men and women, and do not discriminate against gays, and believe everyone should be free to practise religion – but that the government should be separate.

“These are values that are incompatible with extreme values in Islam.”

Saleem Kidwai is chairman of the Muslim Council of Wales. He claimed if Hajar wanted change he would have to be “part of the system.”

“You can make as many videos and shout as much as you want but it won’t make any difference,” he said.

“If you’re a citizen of this country then you have to be an active member of the political process.”

Several attempts were made to reach Abu Hajar but he was unavailable for comment.

South Wales Police declined to comment on the matter.

Angels, Demons and Freemasons: The True Conspiracy, Knights Templar, Illuminati FREE MOVIE

Posted in islam, secret world, Terrorists with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 21, 2012 by britishloyalist

Norway mass murderer’s trial: A timeline

Posted in EU, islam with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on April 21, 2012 by britishloyalist

Oslo: Below are key moments in the first four days of the trial of Norwegian right-wing extremist Anders Behring Breivik at the Oslo District Court on charges of a twin killing spree which cost 77 lives on July 22, 2011:

MONDAY, APRIL 16, 2012

After entering the courtroom for his trial, Breivik makes what he has described as a nationalist salute after his handcuffs are taken off, touching his chest and extending his clenched right fist in front of him.
Breivik enters a plea of not guilty at the start of his trial, saying his acts were “cruel but necessary”.
He cries as the court views a film he posted online the day of the attack. His face red with emotion, Breivik’s lips tremble and he wipes away tears as the 12-minute film is projected on a large screen, including photos and drawings of angry Islamists.
The court sees unreleased surveillance footage of his bomb attack, showing people walking near his parked van in the seconds before it explodes.
The court hears a recording of a desperate emergency call for help from a young woman hiding in the bathroom of the cafe building on the Utoeya island where Breivik massacred 69 at a Labour Party youth summer camp. The court also hears Breivik’s own two calls to police to surrender in the midst of the bloodbath, reporting “mission accomplished”.

TUESDAY, APRIL 17, 2012
One of five judges in the trial is dismissed after the court deems him unfit following revelations he had called for the death penalty for Breivik the day after the attacks.
After he takes the stand on the second day of his trial, Breivik tells the court of the attacks: “Yes, I would have done it again”. He says life in prison or dying for his people would be “the biggest honour”, as the judge repeatedly urges him to wrap up his reading of a prepared text, for which he had been granted a half-hour but which went on for 73 minutes.
He tells the trial his attacks were “preventive” to avoid a European culture war and says he should be freed, after detailing his Islamophobic and anti-multicultural ideology.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18, 2012

Breivik tells the court there are only two possible outcomes of his trial: acquittal or the death penalty, even though Norway does not apply capital punishment.
The prosecutors question Breivik extensively about a network of far-right militants called the Knights Templar, which Breivik claims to be part of but which the prosecution says doesn’t exist, prompting the confessed killer to lose his cool and accuse the prosecutors of “ridiculing” him.
Breivik says there are currently two other one-man Knights Templar cells in Norway “planning attacks” and who could strike at any time.

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

Breivik refrains from making his habitual far-right salute after objections from survivors and victims’ families.
He tells the court he meant to kill the entire Norwegian government, including the prime minister, and not just the eight people who died when he bombed the government building in Oslo.
He also says he intended “to kill everybody” on Utoeya island, and not just the 69 people, mainly teens, he massacred on July 22, when 569 people were on the island taking part in a Labour Party youth camp. He also says he had wanted to behead former Labour prime minister Gro Harlem Brundtland, who had been on the island earlier in the day.

Q&A: Abu Qatada and terrorism deportations

Posted in British Government, islam with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 17, 2012 by britishloyalist

What has the European Court ruled?

Seven judges of the European Court of Human Rights – one of whom is British – have blocked the deportation of cleric Abu Qatada to Jordan. He has been convicted there in his absence of terrorism offences. The UK has been attempting to remove him since 2005. He is currently being held in a special unit at Long Lartin jail in Worcestershire.

Who is Abu Qatada?

His real name is Omar Othman and he is a Palestinian-Jordanian Islamic scholar who was born in Bethlehem. He came to the UK in 1993 and is among a large group of Islamists who fled from the Middle East to London as they faced persecution.

Abu Qatada is an influential supporter of mujahideen causes. He is accused of threatening British national security by supporting terrorism, something he denies. He has never been charged with an offence in the UK, but has been held in detention and had his movements restricted by a control order because he was suspected of playing a key role in radicalisation. The government has been trying to deport him since 2005.

Why did the European court block the deportation?

In their ruling, the judges said that while they were satisfied that the preacher would not face ill-treatment if deported, he could not face a probable retrial in Jordan because the key evidence against him was obtained by torturing others. It said that sending him back to Jordan would legitimise that state’s use of torture.

How important is this case?

This is the first time that the Strasbourg court has ruled that someone cannot be expelled because the torture of others would mean that they would be denied a fair trial.

Why did this case end up at the European Court?

The Court of Appeal in London originally blocked Abu Qatada’s deportation on broadly the same lines as those now used by Europe. But in 2009 the then Law Lords overturned the Court of Appeal’s decision and said that the deportation could go ahead.

The lords ruled that Abu Qatada’s rights would be protected if he were deported. Crucially, they ruled that while evidence against him may have been extracted by torture of another suspect, they had to decide whether a trial based on that material could be fair. They concluded there were no reasonable grounds for believing that the Jordanian courts could not offer a fair trial.

Is this decision final?

Not quite. Both sides have three months to appeal against the ruling to the Grand Chamber of the court – its highest decision-making body. If nobody appeals, it then becomes final. The court has made clear that if the UK obtained an assurance from Jordan that evidence obtained by torture would not be used against Abu Qatada at trial, there would be nothing to stop his deportation. British ministers and officials are now trying to strike a new deal with Jordan that would satisfy the court. However, Abu Qatada would still have the legal right to challenge anything new so nobody is quite clear when we will reach a final judgement in the case.

What happens if he can’t be deported?

At present he remains in detention. But if he is not facing a criminal charge, extradition proceedings or an attempt to deport, then he must be released from jail. The likely scenario is that his activities would be restricted by house arrest-style conditions. The alternatie extreme option is for the Home Secretary to ignore the European Court and deport him anyway. Italy has done this before – but opponents of this move say that it would be enormously damaging to the UK’s reputation.

Does this ruling mean the UK cannot deport any foreign terrorism suspects to regimes with questionable human rights records?

The government has signed deportation deals known as Memorandum of Understanding (MOUs) with four governments – Lebanon, Jordan, Ethiopia and Morocco. There is a further separate agreement with Algeria to look at deportations on a case-by-case basis.

Each of these deals is supposedly a guarantee by the relevant government to protect the human rights of anyone who is deported and some 15 individuals are known to be facing deportation under MOUs.

The European Court has now accepted that the Jordan deal is not only sound but there have been “genuine efforts” to provide detailed assurances that Abu Qatada would not be ill-treated.

“The product of those efforts, the MOU, is superior in both its detail and its formality to any assurances which the Court has previously examined,” said the judgement. “The MOU would also appear to be superior to any assurances examined by the United Nations Committee Against Torture and the United Nations Human Rights Committee. The MOU is specific and comprehensive. It addresses directly the protection of the applicant’s Convention rights in Jordan.”

‘Hook-handed African filth’ to be deported?

Posted in America, islam with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 10, 2012 by britishloyalist

African antisocial turd ‘Abu Hamza’ the Hook-handed example of welfare-tourism and a nadir of the filth dumped on the benefits system paid by the white taxpayer “may” be deported? Do not count on it.

The racist African and islamicist antisocial turd in question has the Race Industry to support him, in addition to millions of other brown supremacist fanatics embedded in the racial ghettoes in the UK.
Hamza is wanted in the U.S. on 11 charges related to taking 16 hostages in Yemen in 1998, promoting violent jihad in Afghanistan in 2001 and conspiring to set up a jihad training camp in Oregon, America”.
Abu Hamza, a prime example of Africa’s exported societal excrement dumped on England.