Archive for belfast

Belfast rioter gets suspended jail term

Posted in British Government, police and the legal system, Terrorists with tags , , , on May 26, 2012 by britishloyalist

A rioter who was caught on CCTV throwing bricks and bottles at police in east Belfast has had a 12 month detention term suspended for two years.

The judge warned Timothy Andrew Baker, 20, he was only suspending the term because of his clear criminal record, guilty plea and good references.

“It is only by the skin of your teeth that you are going out the side door and not the back door,” he said.

Earlier, a prosecuting lawyer told the court that police CCTV footage showed Baker throwing various missiles during rioting on the Newtownards Road on 21 June last year.

It was the second night of rioting, the lawyer said adding that police were able to identify Baker because he was one of the few rioters who was not masked.

When he was arrested and interviewed, Baker admitted joining in the riot and told officers he was only in the area because he had to walk home as there was no public transport due to the previous night’s disturbances.

Baker, from the Beersbridge Road in east Belfast, later pleaded guilty to a single charge of riot.

Solicitor advocate Paul Farrell told the court that the tourism degree student “literally took a wrong turn – a wrong turn on the way home and a wrong turn in his life”.

He said that when he came upon the rioting, Baker was “quite literally a moth attracted to a dangerous flame”.

The judge told the former Royal Belfast Academical Institution pupil he had let his family and himself down and that the message had repeatedly gone out that “people who get involved in riotous situations in this city can expect custodial sentences as an almost automatic consequence”.

However, he added that Baker had “very good prospects” and he was prepared to suspend the sentence to give him a chance.

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7 charged with terror crimes in Real IRA crackdown

Posted in British Government, British history with tags , , , on May 24, 2012 by britishloyalist


Colin Duffy, center, walks outside Lisburn courthouse in Northern Ireland as three relatives of Colin Duffy, a reputed senior Real IRA figure, appeared in a courtroom southwest of Belfast surrounded by police officers in full riot gear Saturday May 19, 2012. Duffy’s brothers, Paul, 47, and Damien, 42, and cousin Shane Duffy, 41, all were charged with four counts of preparing acts of terrorism, conspiring to murder and conspiring to cause explosions. Paul Duffy also was charged with directing terrorism. Seven Irish republicans, including three relatives of a senior reputed Real IRA member and four others allegedly operating a forest rifle range, were arraigned Saturday on terror charges following a security sweep against militants plotting to sabotage Northern Ireland’s peace process. UNITED KINGDOM OUT Photo: Julien Behal/PA Wire / AP

Three shot in Belfast rioting

Posted in northern ireland with tags , , , , , , , , on May 18, 2012 by britishloyalist

Three people were shot as a new wave of sectarian rioting erupted in east Belfast.
Last night, houses were set on fire by petrol bombs and families moved out of a loyalist district after they came under attack from nationalists across a peaceline in the Short Strand.
Police said a 39-year-old man and two 15-year-old youths were shot and injured as gunfire was directed at Cluan Place in the Protestant Albertbridge Road area.
Progressive Unionist Party leader David Ervine, who was at the scene when the violence flared, said the man was taken to hospital after being hit in the back and lower leg.
The East Belfast MLA said he had been told the man’s condition was “ill but comfortable”.
Mr Ervine added that the two youths had suffered bullet wounds to their lower legs.
As blast bombs continued to rain down, Mr Ervine said: “These people have gone through a weekend of terror.”
Residents forced to flee their homes, including several pensioners, were taken to other houses and church halls.
Police said trouble erupted when stones and missiles were thrown into Cluan Place from the Short Strand, a Catholic enclave in Protestant east Belfast.
Later petrol bombs were lobbed at loyalist homes. Two houses were set alight, with fire crews being called to extinguish the blaze.
The disorder followed several nights of fighting between rival mobs in east Belfast which resulted in 10 police officers being injured.
Mr Ervine said the area was extremely volatile and called for more police to be drafted into the Short Strand.
“There are no police resources being put into the nationalist side; if they were they couldn’t do what they are doing,” he claimed.
Earlier, rival mobs clashed during sectarian fighting in the Whitewell Road area of north Belfast.
Police and soldiers came under attack from rival loyalist and nationalist factions.
Up to 100 people who gathered on each side in the Arthur Bridge area hurled stones, bottles, paint and petrol bombs at security forces trying to separate them.
The disorder continued in the nearby Gunnell Hill and Serpentine Road areas, with gangs fighting running battles.
Two people arrested and charged with riotous behaviour were due in court this morning. No injuries to security forces were reported.
Joe O’Donnell, a Belfast Sinn Fein councillor for the Short Strand area, insisted that loyalists had put Catholic homes under siege from gun and blast bomb attack.
“I understand there have been shots fired from here tonight, but there was gunfire into here first,” he said last night.
“We stood and watched 40 or 50 semi-uniformed loyalist paramilitaries march down and line up on the Albertbridge Road.
“I’m now standing with 150 people who have been evicted from their homes.”
Mr O’Donnell said houses in the Short Strand had been decimated.
“This area is completely surrounded by a wall and 70,000 unionists and yet we are the ones targeting them.
“I’m standing here and it looks like Beirut.”

Cardinal Sean Brady rejects resignation calls among new abuse ‘cover-up’ claims

Posted in Nonce cases, scum with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on May 2, 2012 by britishloyalist

The beleaguered head of the Catholic Church in Ireland Cardinal Sean
Brady has vowed to stay on as he attempted to distance himself from a
secret inquiry into one of the country’s most dangerous paedophiles.

Even though he was part of the 1975 investigation into allegations Father Brendan Smyth had attacked at least five children, the Cardinal blamed superiors for failing to stop the evil priest abusing over the next 20 years.

Rejecting growing demands for his resignation, he declared: “There’s no cloaking over or brushing under the carpet.

“We’re not hiding behind procedures. There was no desire on my part to cover up, it was to make sure that this abuse stopped.”

Cardinal Brady, who is due to retire in 2014, faced renewed and deepening demands to quit over the scandal after it emerged a then 14-year-old victim of Smyth’s warned him in secret interviews that it was likely the late priest was abusing five other named children.

“I was shocked, appalled and outraged when I first discovered in the mid-1990s that Brendan Smyth had gone on to abuse others,” he said.

Amid the clamour for his resignation, Church sources indicated an assistant would be appointed to support the Cardinal by the end of the year – at least two years after the request was first made. It is expected the coadjutor bishop will ultimately take over in the Armagh Archdiocese when the Cardinal retires aged 75.

The Primate – a canon lawyer and part-time diocesan secretary at the time – said he regretted some actions during the inquiry but insisted responsibility for the Smyth scandal does not lie with him. He blamed Fr Kevin Smith, the superior in Smyth’s Norbertine Order.

He also claimed that as a priest supporting the investigation, even under today’s rules which enforce mandatory reporting, he would not have been the person responsible for alerting authorities.

“I wasn’t scared or intimidated, not at all,” the Cardinal said.

“I took down everything I heard and referred it back to the people who were in a position to act.”

The Cardinal also claimed his role in the internal Church inquiry – officially recorded as note-taker – had been deliberately exaggerated and misrepresented in a BBC documentary aired last night.

“With others, I feel betrayed that those who had the authority in the Church to stop Brendan Smyth failed to act on the evidence I gave them. However, I also accept that I was part of an unhelpful culture of deference and silence in society and the Church, which thankfully is now a thing of the past,” he said.

Cardinal Brady, a boarding school teacher in Cavan at the time of the inquiry, was drafted in to record confidential interviews with victim Brendan Boland. He was told the names and addresses of another five victims.

Then a priest aged 33, he went on to conduct a second private interview with another victim to corroborate the allegations against Smyth. He did not tell the child’s parents.

Reports were then filed to his superior, the late Bishop Francis McKiernan of Kilmore.

“I deeply regret that those with the authority and responsibility to deal appropriately with Brendan Smyth failed to do so, with tragic and painful consequences for those children he so cruelly abused,” the Cardinal said.

Taoiseach Enda Kenny, who last year launched an unprecedented attack on the Church in the wake of a fifth damning inquiry into clerical abuse and agreed to close the Irish embassy in the Vatican, said the Cardinal should reflect on the new revelations.

Cardinal Brady has the backing of the Vatican’s chief investigator, Monsignor Charles J Scicluna, who said there is no reason for him to resign. Armagh Auxiliary Bishop Gerard Clifford also offered his support.

Three years ago, when explosive allegations about Cardinal Brady’s role in the canonical inquiry into Smyth emerged, he said he would resign if he found his actions or failings had led to another child being abused.

He attempted to qualify that today by saying he was referring specifically to responsibilities he had as a bishop.

“In 1975, I was not a bishop. I was not in that role,” he added.

Some children were abused by Smyth for years after the internal Church inquiry.

It was not until 1994 that Smyth was convicted in a Belfast court of 17 counts of sexual abuse. Three years later in Dublin, he pleaded guilty to another 74 counts of child sexual abuse. He died in prison in 1997.

Brendan Boland, who had been abused during the 1970s from the age of 12, gave the secret inquiry a list of other children he believed were victims – a boy and girl from Belfast and from Cavan, and another boy.

He was told by investigating priests to swear an oath of confidentiality during the Church inquiry which Cardinal Brady now insists was to protect him and ensure Smyth could not manipulate evidence.

The Cardinal accused the BBC of airing a misleading documentary which incorrectly reported his role in the inquiry and his response to the claims.

Late last year Cardinal Brady offered to apologise in person to Mr Boland following an undisclosed out-of-court settlement.

The Vatican press office declined to comment.

The BBC responded to the Cardinal’s claims, saying: “We stand by the programme, which accurately and impartially reports its findings.

“It has been made in accordance with BBC editorial guidelines and fairly represents the position of the Church.”

John Kelly, of the Irish Survivors of Child Abuse, said the Cardinal has failed, like most of the senior hierarchy, to grasp moral leadership.

“He instead reverted to the omerta position of his predecessors, which makes his current position untenable,” Mr Kelly said.